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are transforming the global economy." you also serve as an adviser to the clinton global initiative. what do you advise on? >> well, thank you for asking me that question. push aside the global initiative the last three days and i've been working with them for the last three years. the reason i'm thinking he was saved really appreciated that affiliation. they have a wonderful they are and they need advisors on the program, what sort of things to feature, what people will bring new ideas and challenge that audience to think about better in different ways to engage in the world. it's particularly relevant because in every participants back as they register, they receive a copy of "time" magazine in which president clinton had authored an essay titled the case for optimism. at the clinton global initiative this year, chelsea quite ready session called the case for optimism. and again she was interviewed by charlie rose and that was the focal point of their conversation. so you know, i am totally synchronous with that message and with the click global initiatives focused on finding solutions to the
not mentioned it yet, but dewit clineton -- clinton that he was he that dreamed up the erie canal. it wasn't. it was actually -- at first been proposed in 180 # 7 by a fellow who had intended to be the first western grain per chant of western new york, but he went broke because he discovered there was no good way to get the grain grown by the pioneer farmers, actually to get that grain east as i describedded. there was no good route, and he wound up, this fellow, jesse holly, his name, another connecticut native who tried to find phenomenonture -- fortune in the west, western new york, but he ends up in prison, and under a pseudoanymore, he argues and preparing and arguing for a canal across new york state to lake erie. dewit clinton picks up the idea three years later, and he makes the erie canal happen. if you don't know anything about him, he's a long time new york city mayor, new york state lawmaker, a congressman, one of the canal commissioners eventually, he's a long time new york governor, a new york city benefactor, social reformer, and nearly president in 1812 over madison, but th
but like our last president, president clinton you can get a lot of blows and shoulder your vote in a couple of places like florida. now, that is the con so you ask yourself where is the democratic party? remember them? the democratic party. the biological problem as you know as many of you have taken american biology is democrats -- jellyfish don't have spines and don't count and political parties to save your vote. it's not even right now. remember the jim crow laws were written by democrats and used today by republicans and analyst. is bipartisan apartheid my friends. history moves in waves. when i was in new mexico, one of the worst dates in florida and ohio and new mexico led terms of the loss of. george bush won new mexico in 2004 by 5000. it's amazing. most of voters or minority citizens, hispanic, overwhelmingly democrat. how do you end up with a republican governor and republican senator and george bush? they threw 30,000 in the garbage including the for the soldier -- do they have the special soldier present, absentee ballots for soldiers. every single ballot by a soldi
were saved in a different way. welfare and law and order were so successful, bill clinton claimed credit for both. [laughter] we had 12 years of paradise, that's in the chapter, post-oj pair dice describing wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on egg shells anymore with the list of words you just mentioned. people had to be worried back then you would innocently say a word that would be deemed racist. you would ruin your career. you would be -- you would be hated by all of human kind. that was over after oj. a lot of the change after oj was really very subtle, but it was a wonderful thing that happenedded for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long time ago, and along comes obama, the most liberal candidate on a mar joy party ticket to seek the presidency in the nation's history so, you know, it's a two -for for liberals. they are call him president. we are all back on egg shells again. admittedly, not delicately on those egg shoals. [laughter] thus my introduction. [laughter] i'm going to a debate party tonight, the host, has called me racist p
administration even though it was approved by the state department, hillary clinton, and here's the one that -- here's the one that kills me the most. you know the way china is burning our coal? sending it up to the environment? china has agreed with cuba that it's going to drill for oil 20 miles off the coast of cuba which, i think, is 70 miles off the coast of florida? we're not drilling for it? it's our oil. explain that to me. china is going to do it safer than we would do it? we're not drilling because we're afraid of an oil spill, but china is going to extract the oil from the ground in a safer way than we do? this election is going to be two very, very different directions. obama gets re-elected, i say he reaffirms and in stronger terms his just say no approach to energy. i think nuclear power is finished. coal is finished. fracking gets slowed down because if you get intimidated by the environmentalists over the keystone pipeline, wait until you see what they do to him over fracking. we'll work on wind and solar, and china's working on everything else, and once again, we're goin
successful, law-and-order policies were so successful that bill clinton started claiming credit for both. we had 12 years of paradise where i described the many wonderful things that happened and most of all people were not walking on eggshells anymore as with the list of words you just mentioned. people had to be worried about them. innocent words that were deemed racist and ruin your career. you would be aided by all of humankind. that was over. a lot of the change after o.j. was very subtle but it was a wonderful thing that happened for race relations in america. that faded. it happened daylong time ago and a long comes barack obama, the most liberal candidate in the nation's history. they get a liberal president and attacked critics are calling them racist. with obama it has come back. we are walking on egg shells again. admittedly not very delicately on those egg shells. just my introduction. i am going to a debate party tonight, the racist pete said debate party, because he is having it in his apartment. apartment. it is an apartment. maybe it is not being taken quite as seriously have
the official policy of federal government actually occurred during the clinton administration when the iraq liberation act was passed in 1998 and signed into law by president clinton and supported by many republicans in congress. it had bipartisan support. vice president gore was a supporter, that is why i am not completely convinced that that is a counterfactual point. we have a lot of interest and people were casting around, trying to find solutions. and i do think the initialization of afghanistan was correct, whether that means we need to be there for 10 years or until afghanistan becomes connecticut, that is another matter entirely. but i think the initial strikes against those were necessary and just. but then to go out and pursue regime change, prior to 9/11, they simply casted in search of a solution to a problem with a little class saw. >> libertarianism was fiscally conservative, so we will get back to the middle point. based on what he just said, during the bush years, bush-cheney, the focus was foreign policy. guantÁnamo bay, civil liberties, there is something that animated th
during the 2008 primary that when hillary clinton was succeeding in getting a large portion of the working-class vote and bringing them back to the democratic party the default for a lot of people on the left is to call that racism the only reason those people were voting for her is because they wouldn't vote for a black man. we all know that is absolutely true for some people but i didn't think it was true for a majority of people and it brought home to me something that i have the feeling in san francisco for a long time and going back to the stories that i did for image and salon and realizing that our sort of black-and-white, literally race relations paradigm wasn't working in a state certainly where the fastest-growing groups are latinos and asians and certainly before this primary that our language was exclusionary and that white liberals in particular seem to be never happier than when they can scapegoat and show that they are the good people and those ignorant people are the trouble. so i began to think about why we continue to use such exclusionary terms about polit
congress, and so he was forced, willy-nilly, if you're going to have a budget at all--and mr. clinton is going to discover this--you just have to go along, in the end, with congress. and he did not bankrupt the country. he did--he tried to control spending. he was just in too weak a position to do so. c-span: so you just wash your hands of any of the problems today that were brought about by supply-side economics. >> guest: well, the problems ex--they weren't brought about by supply-side economics. they were brought about, i would say, by irresponsible congressional expenditures. but it doesn't matter. the problems are real. i mean, they're with us. i mean, medicare, medicaid, things that originally were thought to involve the expenditure of perhaps a few billion dollars suddenly are s--going at the rate of tens of billions of dollars, which no one really anticipated, but which a thoughtful person might have-not anticipated, but say at some point, 'we have to take another look and check it out.' so i will defend ronald reagan's economic policies. i think he's been given a raw deal by
of president bill clinton. i mean, you are coming in at abc in the 90's. bill clinton, president, he had the impeachment lows. did you have to deal with any of the second term clinton problems? >> a good part of my first year at abc news was dealing with the clinton issues. i mean, the monitor lewinsky story broke ten months into my tenure i was done in cuba. the pope was visiting cuba. we had everyone down there. well over 100 people down there to cover this event. d'agata call one at when i was out to dinner from the desk in new york saying we have this investigation we have had going on that looks like it's going to break. there is this young intern who has told her close friend that she had a relationship, and a proper relationship with the president and i said, that's just ridiculous. that can't be right. we have no reason to believe she's telling the truth, so forget it. i went back in to dinner and about an hour they call back and said we have just confirmed that janet reno, the attorney general has formally and officially expanded the investigation into the whitewater, the whitew
importance for our president in the next four years. secretary of state hillary clinton who offered a foreign policy address on this very stage just two weeks ago has written in foreign policy about the growing significance of the u.s. asian relationship. she wrote, one of the most important tasks of american statecraft over the next decade will be to lock in a substantially increased investment, diplomatic, economic, strategic and otherwise in the asia-pacific region. the secretary went on to describe the work ahead. success requires maintaining and advancing a bipartisan consensus on the importance of the asia-pacific to our national interests. we seek to build upon a strong tradition of engagement by presidents and secretaries of state, of both parties, across many decades. the breath and tenor of leadership, diplomatic work across many years and spending both political parties at our panelists represent today. and it's the work that georgetown has committed itself to pursuing to the expanding work of our asian studies program, and several other programs across our campus, that explore thr
should do it the way president clinton did it. ask for shared sacrifice. particularly for millionaires and billionaires. i will take one exception was the question. social security and medicare. >> moderator: even under the affordable care, medicare as we knew it, wouldn't survive much beyond the next decade or so. what specific things we do for medicare to make sure that redline doesn't keep going right through the group. rozum: patients need to have choices of doctors. medicare does stabilize cost. buerkle: >> moderator: mr. maffei. maffei: we have added nine years of solvency. but we need to get health care costs down. that would mean that it would be $6000 short of what they can afford now. >> moderator: ms. buerkle? buerkle: there have been a number of distortions that have been promoted. this is one of them. the affordable care act, as you pointed out, cuts medicare for current seniors at $700 billion. medicare has been changed for our seniors right now, unless we repeal the affordable care act. ryan budget is not a voucher program. it is a needs-based government supported premiu
40 years. tied with clinton and incumbent in 1996 and look at the wonders that produce. it produces disaster as it did nric city and it has with barack obama. you can see in last week's debate, that was the first objective thing obama has. for four years he has been coddled by the media. i mean i guess he faced sort of a tough opponent with hillary and linton but who is she? she is the wife of an impeached ex-president and that is how she made her name. still, she was better than john mccain. and you know in the hillary obama debate, the questions going question's going to obama were so thoughtful saturday night live did a sketch on it with hillary being asked these incredibly intricate, complicated policy questions and then the moderator asking obama if he would like another pillow. [laughter] and that was a fair summary and the stunning thing of last week's debate was and how poorly obama did. he is as good as he ever was. [applause] if john mccain had been on the stage with him, we would be the ones -- [inaudible] that is how magnificent mitt romney was in was the first time obam
support taking it back to what it was in the 1990s under clinton. >> moderator: congressman? dold: we want to keep investing. having said that, when we talk about a grand scheme or something working across the aisle, that could be on the table. >> moderator: congressman, charitable deductions, should they stay or go? dold: it's one of the things that has to stay. schneider: one of the things that makes us stronger is the sense we have of taking care of our neighbors. i would keep it. gld brad schneider, one corporate tax loophole you would like to close? dold: i think we have to lower the rates to make ourselves more globally competitive. so comprehensive tax reform, certainly something i've supported and, actually, one of the things that i passed out of the house of representatives, my opponent talked about how this is the most unproductive congress, yet as a freshman i've passed six pieces of legislation, two signed into law by the president. i was able to pass with overwhelming bipartisan support the global investment and american jobs act trying to focus on getting more americans, more
to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration when those upper income earners were doing well and the entire economy was growing. we are going to have to make some tough choices and a balanced approach is the only approach i believe will get us there. >> heather, your rebuttal? >> it's amazing to me congressman heinrich that you can stand here having voted for a trillion dollar deficits for the last four years, the largest debt increase in american history and say that we have to control spending. you have done nothing to control spending over the last four years and with respect to cut gap and balance it's amazing to me also this idea of cutting wasteful spending, capping the ability of congress to spend money we don't have and balancing the budget is extreme. i think it would force congress to set priorities and stop funding things like solyndra and prioritize things like social security, medicare and education and that is why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. e. republican congre
about president bill clinton, president george w. bush, why are those not fatal mistakes? >> i think they're at two things going on. one is what else is going on in the world of the time? john mccain made a comment about he was asked a question about what would he do in iran and someone said an air mail message and he went on saying singing bob bob ran. very few people remember that a lot of things were happening in the world at the time. nobody carried it on. i compare that to hillary clinton's statement about being under fire in bosnia. it was time after time after time until the media started to say well is this really chew and all of a sudden they pulled up a picture of her being greeted at the airport being greeted by a girl with a bunch of flowers and there is a general in the ground saying there was no fire and the obama people start to say you might want to look at her credibility on these things and it was so dramatic that we don't like people to lie to us. this is about as close as a presidential candidate obama looking at fellow democrats saying she lied to us. who else is
-president biden was there today's topic for reelection. expected to be joined by former president bill clinton, and you can watch that live at 3:30 p.m. eastern on our companion network c-span. >> as you consider that, you know, while ago no one would ever agree to carry around a tracking device. now we all carry around cell phones, which you can inherit the track. no one would ever have posted, you know, let anyone read their you know, right now all of us use the e-mail and it's all store on the server by go will. and so this is interesting that we, as a society, have given our information out. >> we were looking into cyber and cyber security, cyber war. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of war, and yet we realize that maybe one in 1,000 people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. and so what we are trying to do is to take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals of the platonic idea that everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understan
the clinton administration and those upper income earners were doing well in the entire economy was growing. we are going to have to make some tough choices and a balanced approach is the only approach that i believe will get us there. >> you're rebuttal? >> it's amazing that you can stand here having voted for a trillion dollar deficit for the last four years. the largest, fastest that increase in american history and say that we have to control spending. you have done nothing to control spending over the last four years. with respect to cut cabin balance it's amazing to me also that the idea of cutting wasteful spending, capping the ability of congress to spend money we don't have, and balancing the budget is extreme. i think it would force the congress to set priorities and stop funding things like cylinder solyndra and prioritize like social security, medicare and education and that's why i support the balanced budget to the constitution. >> i especially like watching the gavel-to-gavel coverage. it is really only the place to get the real deal and i also enjoy newsmakers and the book p
is this is what president clinton mentioned in the democratic convention. she voted for the same thing anywhere. it's in the ryan budget. the ryan budget keeps these cuts. so and ann marie buerkle talk that we need to do differently, how come she hasn't? she's been the congresswoman for two years. where's the change? buerkle: let's be real clear. the affordable care act in its current form cuts medicare for our seniors by $700 billion. a cut of medicare advantage by two and 50 billion, and 300 billion the cbo has is with us cuts to be even more. that does not add cats to insurance coverage to medicare is a federal program. it will be cuts to the services that are hospitals and physicians can provide for our seniors. those will be the cuts. the impact our seniors will be real. we are already hearing from our constituents saying that the cabinet decision you will treat medicare patients. it's real and it is a really consequence of this affordable care act. >> moderator: ursala rozum, 30 seconds. rozum: i think disagreement over the affordable care act and constant debate over health care that we
that would lead as mrs. clinton has said to equate using the sanctions and i think the solution is for iran to find a way to accept the deal that is on offer. thank you. >> 's thank you. [applause] >> we have some good questions here, but let me ask if anyone wants to comment on this because the title is american and arab policy shortcomings. people emphasize u.s. policy. does anyone want to comment on what the gcc countries think about american policy in the region in terms of its containment? for example, it seems to me they're generally satisfied with the defense cooperation and have accepted and cooperated on sanctions, but they have considerable concerns about war and considerable concerns about consequences of iraq and what our policy is in syria and certainly palestine. so would anyone like to comment about that? >> can everybody hear me? i think part of iran's failure is isolating itself from its neighbors, particularly the gcc states. under ahmadinejad in 2005, the islamic republic has done a lot to scare everybody in the region. but a range of other actions when you look at irania
, but when i worked there during the clinton administration it was absolutely not apolitical. people make decisions about what it will find, what you will do. i was told that during the bush administration the oig would write reports. that are be completely redlined and turned into a one page memo if it did not fall on certain lines. so i do not think that as possible. >> let me disagree a little bit. maybe not vigilance, but with resources in our world, all these complaints about not covering the good news, different types of news that come from different types of entities can be reapportioned to other needs. the mayor's office, they had at 1.3 of some of the best former writers in town, former journalists. they could have produced a voice of the mayor's office that was interesting to read, that i would have read. that -- is that government propaganda? of course it is. but on the other hand, n look, nfl.com is doing. they ron collins and analysis, interesting conflict-type stories -- run columns and interesting conflict-type stories. resources are going direct. in a world of dwindling re
the first, the first republican control of both houses during the clinton administration, we were able to balance the budget for the first time in over 40 years. the poverty level was not as high. kids were taken care of. you're looking at a person who has passed children's legislation to help them. and nobody in utah should suffer and go without. but mitt romney covered last night how important it is that we have a good economy and that we get people back to work. and that we get jobs. that's why he's going to win this presidency. regardless of what happened last night or what the pundits say, mitt was right. and, frankly, that's the only way we're going to pull ourselves out of here. think about it. when this president took over, 32 million people were on food stamps. today 47 million just a year or two later. now, all i can say is that we've got to change it, and i agree with scott, we all need to change it for the benefit of children. >> moderator: a rebuttal, mr. howell? howell: well, i don't think there's a rebuttal because orrin and i know we shouldn't have starving children. my
. by also say i find it a little distressing when the president has secretary of state hillary clinton stand up to take the blame, a leader takes the blame. someone should be held accountable, it should be president obama. i really was disturbed when he had hillary clinton stand up and take the blame. that's not what a leader does. >> you want to respond to that at all? hochul: we agree on how the situation was handled. we must in watching different debate. i remember the president the united states take responsibly for those actions. >> go ahead spent we will move onto the next question and that is for mr. collins. super pac ad was released recently claim you fired one of 50 workers at buffalo china but several sources have criticized this had called it false. now, the question is, do you hold your opponent responsible, or can can this be held responsible engine for super pac adds that are made on their opponents behalf? collins: , i'm glad you brought this up. she's running wild. in fact, i save 245 jobs if ms. hochul with just a privacy and go china. i was lauded for a good step in into t
clinton's national security operation form. last month in new york, it provides a venue for collaborative securities discussions with all of the gcc nations. but something has changed. it was reflected in the recent summit last august. i spoke with many of and some of them spoke with a different idea in the atmosphere of the meetings. one individual in particular described it this way. he said the attendees had constituent concerns. these concerns were expressed. they were not just representing their government. there was a keen sense that they were representing their people. plus, they had to go back home. they had to explain their roles to their people. the arab spring has produced a very real sense of accountability on the part of the leadership in the region. .. the operative word for government was controlled. you can show the media and the message. you control the population is at the borders. you control local and regional events. it was true for the governments of the region. it is true for u.s. policy as reflected in the outsize focus on military capability. but today, informatio
. the clintons, i suppose to some extent. it's not uncommon to have a marriage for couples kind of take turns. i think that takes the pressure off of a marriage, like the marriage that one read about in 1962 with a woman fell and fell and the man felt like there was a news around his neck because there is so much pressure on him. that model of marriage has loosened up a little bit and created fairly happy comestible marriages for the college-educated. >> guest: >> host: i wonder about kids. clearly more kids in day care, small children in day care now there were 40 years ago. how can that be a good thing? >> guest: lots of countries. scandinavian countries, children go to day care when their one and mother stay home. of that is necessarily a bad thing. surveys are pretty politically neutral. the only measure americans, how much time you spend in leisure activities, how much time you spend with your kids. parents spend more time with their children now than they did in the 60's and 70's. don't ask me how. >> host: but there are still, i'm pretty sure the data supports this point. more 1-year-old
of chinese politics from m.i.t. to my far light is winston lawyered. he serves a a for president bill clinton. he mostly recented received a co-chairman of the oversea of the international rescue committee largest nonsectarian organization that helps refugees abroad and resettles them in the united states. he is at the long career of bipartisan service in the u.s. government, and special assistant to the national security adviser he accompanying henry on the secret visit to china and president nixon as well as subsequent trips by president ford and dr. kissinger. he serve as the u.s. ambassador in bay shinning under president reagan an bush. ambassador's key governmental signment were from 1973 to '77 in the defense and state department in the 9160s. in between the post he helped and headed a variety of private organizations related to international affairs. he was president of the counsel on foreign relations. as well as chairman of the national endowment for democracy and chairman of the carnegie on america in the new world. ambassador lord earned a ba from yale and a ma from fletcher. he r
bush via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second question texas. so too does the natives and so ways a watershed election. it ends the 40 year. the sun belt dominance. their issues critical in the politics that developed that came out of the sun belt. they didn't have a conservative cast of them. they tended to be oriented about issues of strong national defense, and opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also is in the south and southwest that we see the rise at an 1870s when they come to talk about the religious right. the rise of evangelicals involved in the political process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront about this issues in his own politics. national defense, who is a staunch anti-communist and played a role in
. liberals were elected tony blair, bill clinton wing of the democratic party. pro-business, but they tend to favor economic outcomes, so they want to control economic outcome. that's their main focus. to give unionized police officers officers, unionized teachers. progressives are entirely different beast. these are the typical tree hugging san francisco liberals. that's progressives. that's who we're talking about. these are people and today not just economic outcomes, but also social outcomes. was conservatives are interested in talking about drugs and sex, progressives are interested in whether or not you can put salt on your french fries and whether you can have a plastic bag or two desoto. michael bloomberg, great example of progressive. you spending cuts in new york city. siddhartha were talking about. protecting about that ideology of the left, the progressive ideology. so what are some myths that are commonly held by progressives? we've got about five minutes and we tend to focus on the first two because those are the big juicy ideas, the bad ideas actually. one is that natural th
exploring for oil offshore in the gulf and that is absolute treason against posterity. >> host: bill clinton and former president was in minnesota yesterday campaigning for the president. here's what he had to say on the store and climate change. >> was in closely to the candidate said in the debates. in the first debate, the triumph of the moderate mitt romney. you know what he did? he ridiculed the president. ridiculed the president for his effort to fight global warming in an economically beneficial way. he said you are going to turn back the sea. if we could have done that mr. de. all up and down the east coast there are mayors many of them republican who are being told you've got to move these houses back away from the ocean. you better call lifted them up. climate changes clinton lifted the levels on a permanent basis. if you want your home injured, you have to do this. in the real world, barack obama's policies worked better. >> host: former president bill clinton in minnesota yesterday talking about climate -- global climate change and mitt romney's policies on that. we will hear fro
question is secretary clinton has implemented the quadrennial review of diplomacy and development. i was wondering how you assess the impact has been on the way u.s. develops policy for asia and if there's any other procedural or structural reforms to the foreign policy apparatus do you feel would enhance our ability to the challenges. thank you. >> i major john garber u.s. army and a doctorate student in chinese history here at georgetown. the military to military relations. you mention the air force and the navy in this region. my question in particular has to do with the view that the military to military relations are less than robust, the u.s. and china. what area to see and of what is what our energy descent on relation. this is her advantage of them in. >> i think we'll use both of these as an opportunity for all of our test to make their final comments. so unless he is quite general review. >> thank you. look, it's helpful the quadrennial diplomacy review. it's helpful in terms of how to recognize from the challenges we face not just in asia, but globally. the key to the stat
being more like the tony blair or bill clinton wing of the democratic party. pro-business but they favor economic outcomes. they want to control economic outcomes. that is their main focus. think of unionized police officers, unionized teachers. progressives are different beast. these are the people, the typical tree hugging san francisco liberals, that is who we are talking about. people who are interested not just in economic outcomes but social outcomes. whereas conservatives are interested in talking about drugs and sex progressives are interested in talking about whether you can put salt in your french fries and whether you can have a plastic bag or drink a soda. michael bloomberg, great example. that is what we are talking about, that ideology of left, the progressive ideology. what are some myths commonly held by today's progressives? we have five myths but we tend to focus on the first two because those of the jews the ideas. one is that natural things are good. and unnatural things are bad. and checked science will destroy us. science is only relative anyway and science is on ou
for the clinton years, through the bush years and through the obama years. so for 11 years i was there. my role was to detect and deter a waste, fraud, and abuse and improve the economy and efficiency of the agency. i believe very strongly, and we believe strongly that it was important for the citizens to know what their government was doing, and that's not only in the law enforcement context but in the intelligence area as well and we did a number of very sensitive reviews and intelligence matters ranging from the review of the robert hansen case that the fbi, why was it that robert hanson could be a spy and the fbi's mr. several decades without them finding out. when it initially came out the fbi said, well, it's because of his widely trade craft. the new tax politics system. rasta look at it and determine that was not true. they have a lax internal security methods and that he needed improvement. not only do we do that report from, but we also made public the findings of that report. a lot of people said how can you do that? a very sensitive area. top-secret. but the push very hard to make a
the clinton administration was absolutely not a political. people make decisions about what course you're going to take and what you're going to do. i was told during the bush administration, they would write reports that would be completely red lined and turn into a 1-page memo as it followed certain lines. i think that is not possible. >> let me disagree a little bit. maybe there's not vigilance but there is with resources in our world dwindling, all these complaints about not covering good news or different types of news that come from different entities could be reapportioned to other needs. look at locally the mayor's office had 1.3 of the best former writers in town, journalists -- [talking over each other] the >> could have produced a voice of the mayor's office that did quite well. is that government propaganda? of course it is. but on the other hand, look at what the nfl.com does. .. >> what about the ngo as a place? i mean, you know, human rights watch, journalistic awards for its work. again, in los angeles area the best, one of the best investigative reporters i worked with
for the inspector general. we don't have to submit our resignation to i remain in the administration for the clinton years, through the bush years after the obama years. for for 11 years i was there. our role is to detect and deter waste, fraud, and abuse, and improve the economy and efficiency of the agency. but our role was also to promote transparency and what the agency did, because i believe very strong and we believe are strongly that it was important for the citizens in the at the government was doing. that's the point in the law enforcement context, but in the intelligence area as well. we did reduce intelligence matters ranging from review of the robert hanssen case at the fbi, why wasn't the robert hanssen could be a spy and fbi missed for several decades, when it initially came out, the fbi said it was because of his wily tradecraft picking out to exploit the system and we are asked to look at it determined that that was not true. that they had lax internal security methods and that he it needed improvement. not only did we do that report but we also made public the findings of the report
that there could be a deal that would lead as mrs. clinton has said to a quick easing of sanctions, and i think the solution is for iran to find a way to accept the deal that is honorable. thank you. [applause] >> some good questions here, but let me ask if anyone wants to comment on this. because the title is american and arab policies and shortcomings. people emphasized the u.s. policy but does anyone want to comment on what the gcc countries think about american policy in the region in terms of its containment or of iran? for example, it seems to me that they are generally satisfied with defense cooperation and have accepted and cooperated on sanctions, but they have considerable concerns about war and considerable concerns about the consequences of iraq and what our policy is in syria, and certainly palestine. so would anyone like to comment about that? >> can everybody hear me? so, i think part of iran's favor is isolating itself from the neighborhood in terms that particularly the gcc states. under ahmadinejad since 2005, the islamic republic has done a lot to scare everybody in the regio
as u.s. district judge for the district of columbia appointed by president clinton 94 and served on the intelligence surveillance court. thank you all three of you for coming. we will start with panelists making remarks and then move on to the question and answer. >> thank you. karen come thank you for putting the panel together in for inviting me. i've been involved with karen and this organization and its predecessors since 2005, and it's one of the most fun things i do. beyond my day job is to get to be in discussion with many of your rent the room from old friends, and great to meet some new friends as well. let me just throw out a couple of first principles regarding secrecy, classified information and then make a couple observations about the cases of which my district currently has several under way. first a point of agreement i think for everyone on this panel. i assume everybody in this room, the importance of a free press, and the need to avoid interference with its appropriate functioning. the stipulated believe that the vigilance media is the core pillar in our democr
that was passed in the clinton years. these folks are i'm sure, sheldon, et al. and others have been found of work on this issue. if you look at the employment rates of single mothers and you compare them to the unemployment rate of say, married moms can begin, controlling for education so you're not getting that in the next. you will find, donna and other folks at the center on budget have done this work, you will find that the unemployment rate of single moms grow precipitously, growth steeply in the 1990s. now, part of that is a murray a fact, and it has to do with requirements within welfare program. researchers try to tease out what shares, with a full public job market for the first time in decades. i don't think we've had one before or since. we had a full employment -- we're large increase in the earned income tax credit which incentivizes were. we had an increase in the minimum wage. a lot of moving parts. alston is employment rates of. the analysis suggests that maybe 15 or 20% of it was well for reform. the rest of economy and measures like the earned income credit and solar. so you hav
of president bill clinton. you come been during the '90s with the impeachment, i did you have to deal with second term clinton problems? >> a good part of my first year was dealing with the clinton issues. monica linds the broke 10 months into my tenure january 1998. i was down in cuba. 10 days peter jennings and ted koppel was down to cover the event from cokie roberts say we have this investigation that looks like it will break a young intern who has told her close friend she had a relationship with the president. i said that is ridiculous. we have no reason to believe she tells the truth. and we just confirm janet reno is officially expanded the investigation into the whitewater investigation with obstruction of justice charges relating to this young woman. than we were off and running. you cannot ignore that. later we broke the story. some of the supporters were upset being buffeted by both sides and abc news were put in front and center early on this story of the infamous blue dress. we had that exclusively personally vetted. one lesson learned an exclusive is great as long as it
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